\ purslane (Portulaca oleracea) | rich in minerals for depression

Purslane | An Herb | An Anti-Depressant!

nancy konciljagurish

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"Many people get the urge to eat when they are depressed. And eating just might help - if you eat the right foods."

 

"Common in our yards but little known in the North American kitchen, purslane is both delicious and exceptionally nutritious. Common purslane (Portulaca oleracea) - also known as duckweed, fatweed, pursley, pussley, verdolagas and wild portulaca - is the most frequently reported "weed" species in the world. It can grow anywhere that has at least a two-month growing season.

Until recently, most research on purslane has focused on its eradication. A frequently

overlooked approach to controlling this weed is to eat it!

Purslane is so surprisingly tasty, North Carolina market gardener Patryk Battle says, "I                                                        

have rarely had anybody not buy purslane after they've tried it.""  (See this below! ~~~Mrs. Nancy Gurish)

Power Packed Purslane

By Frances Robinson
April/May 2005
 

Common in our yards but little known in the North American kitchen, purslane is both delicious and exceptionally nutritious. Common purslane (Portulaca oleracea) - also known as duckweed, fatweed, pursley, pussley, verdolagas and wild portulaca - is the most frequently reported "weed" species in the world. It can grow anywhere that has at least a two-month growing season.

Until recently, most research on purslane has focused on its eradication. A frequently

overlooked approach to controlling this weed is to eat it!

Purslane is so surprisingly tasty, North Carolina market gardener Patryk Battle says, "I

have rarely had anybody not buy purslane after they've tried it."

Purslane is somewhat crunchy and has a slight lemony taste. Some people liken it to watercress or spinach, and it can substitute for spinach in many recipes. Young, raw leaves and stems are tender and are good in salads and sandwiches. They can also be lightly steamed or stir-fried. Purslane's high level of

pectin (known to lower cholesterol) thickens soups and stews

.

Battle also uses purslane in pesto. He throws basil and purslane (upper stems and all) into a blender or food processor, adds a small amount of olive oil, garlic, pine nuts and enough hot water to get a good consistency. Because it's so juicy, purslane helps create a low-fat pesto without too much oil.

A Nutrient-Rich Weed

Purslane may be a common plant, but it is uncommonly good for you. It tops the list of plants high in vitamin E and an essential omega-3 fatty acid called alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Purslane

provides six times more vitamin E than spinach and seven times more beta carotene than carrots.

It's also

rich in vitamin C, magnesium, riboflavin, potassium and phosphorus.

Omega-3s are a class of polyunsaturated essential fatty acids. Your body cannot manufacture essential fatty acids, so you must get them from food. Unfortunately, the typical American diet contains too few omega-3s, a shortage that is linked to a barrage of illnesses including heart disease, cancer and Alzheimer's disease.

ALA is most commonly found in plants and grass-fed meat and eggs. Artemis Simopoulos, co-author of The Omega Diet, says purslane is one of the richest known plant sources of ALA: It contains 15 times the amount found in most iceberg lettuce.

In addition to ALA, other omega-3s include eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids mostly found in aquatic plants and animals, especially oily fish. Nutritionists now think all forms of omega-3s need to be plentiful in our diets p lants such as purslane may be part of the missing link to better nutrition. Ethnobiologists - scientists who study the relation between primitive human societies and the plants in their environment - believe that the plants humans ate long ago provided a greater proportion of nutrients than the plants we consume today. They estimate, for instance, that humans 40,000 to 10,000 years ago consumed an average of 390 milligrams per day of vitamin C from wild plants and fruits. In contrast, the average American today consumes just 88 milligrams of vitamin C per day. One cup of cooked purslane has 25 milligrams (20 percent of the recommended daily intake) of vitamin C.
(Please click through the heading to this full article and source! ~~~Nancy)

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